• Gods of the Maya, 5 Coin Set

    Within a handsome collectors box, four Mayan gods are brought to life in stunning high and low relief and innovative and vivid 'virtual enamel' coloring. Issued by the Central Bank of Guatemala, the brilliant centerpiece coin featuring the ancient Maya capital city of Tikal is an addition to the UNESCO World Heritage Coin, and the first to also be included within a collection outside of that program.

  • ITZAMNA God of Divination

    Itzamná originated as a creator god. He was particularly associated with the sun, with day and night, and by extension, with all reptilian life. In fact, in Yucatecan Maya, his name means ‘reptile house.’  Reptiles were commonly agents of omens and visions, so it is unsurprising Itzamná was worshipped as a god of divination. He is often seen with a disc of obsidian, a tool of prophecy. He was frequently posed as a sacred scribe, and thus was also a god of writing and of books, both enormously sacred to the Maya.

  • AH BOLOM TZACAB God of Royalty

    AH BOLOM TZACAB God of Royalty: Meaning ‘leaf-nosed,’ Ah Bolom Tzacab has origins as the lightning aspect of the rain and thunder god Chaac. As such, he was closely tied to agriculture and prosperity, and ultimately, to the ‘lightning power’ of the king. Often portrayed with a ‘lightning axe’ in his forehead, Ah Bolom Tzacab was intimately allied to the ruling class. His three-part name is indicative of his noble affiliation, and it was he who was consulted when choosing the proper bloodlines to ensure healthy offspring and royal succession.

  • Parque Nacional Tikal UNESCO World Heritage Site

    One of the major sites of ancient Maya civilization, Tikal was inhabited from the 6th century B.C. to the 10th century A.D. It is estimated that at its peak Tikal boasted nearly 90,000 inhabitants. Parque Nacional Tikal is one of the few World Heritage properties inscribed according to both natural and cultural criteria for its extraordinary biodiversity and archaeological importance.

  • KUKULCAN God of Creation

    Known as the Plumed or Feathered, Serpent, Kukulcán became one of the most prevalent deities throughout Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. He seems to have possessed many attributes, but it is perhaps as humankind’s civilizing teacher of the agricultural arts that Kukulcán is best known, and which ultimately established him as a god of creation. Kukulcán is closely related to the Aztec god Quetzalcoatl. In the Mayan Post Classic period, Kukulcán is often portrayed as a serpent from whose open mouth protrudes the head of a warrior.

  • CHAAC God of Rain

    Both a benevolent and warlike god, Chaac strikes the clouds with his lightning axe to produce thunder and rain. In turn, Chaac was greatly responsible for prosperous crops. He was both one and manifold, with four Chaacs based in the cardinal directions and wearing corresponding directional colors. The chaacmool, portrayed here, does not represent the god himself, but is closely associated with Chaac in today’s cultural consciousness since these sculptures are often found at the four cardinal points on the uppermost tiers of temple pyramids.

  • Gods of the Maya, 5 Coin Set

    Within a handsome collectors box, four Mayan gods are brought to life in stunning high and low relief and innovative and vivid 'virtual enamel' coloring. Issued by the Central Bank of Guatemala, the brilliant centerpiece coin featuring the ancient Maya capital city of Tikal is an addition to the UNESCO World Heritage Coin, and the first to also be included within a collection outside of that program.

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